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Author Topic: Bad Lifestyles Crippling the NHS  (Read 132 times)
everso
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MR. PHILLIPS


« on: October 10, 2017, 12:35:17 pm »

This is today's Daily Mail front page headline (yes I know, but bear with me).  The Care Quality Commission says GP surgeries are straining at the seams, that there's a lack of beds and insufficient staff.  Apparently it's all our fault because of our lifestyle choices, which might be true, but if there weren't so many cures for heart disease, cancer, etc., we'd mostly be living our three score years and ten if we were lucky, then neatly pegging out without succumbing to Alzheimer's and needing all this attention.

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ymrader
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« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2017, 03:46:00 am »

Not migrants anymore then?
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Alte Dame, Alte Dame
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Die Farben Blau-Weiß,
die Trikots gestreift,
im Herzen weht nur eins:
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everso
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MR. PHILLIPS


« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2017, 07:59:43 am »

Not migrants anymore then?

I daresay they make up a fair percentage of the population, so, yes, they would be included too  Smiley
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ymrader
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« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2017, 08:09:12 am »

I daresay they make up a fair percentage of the population, so, yes, they would be included too  Smiley

Yeah, a whopping 9%
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Alte Dame, Alte Dame
Hertha BSC, so schön ist dein Name!
Die Farben Blau-Weiß,
die Trikots gestreift,
im Herzen weht nur eins:
Unsere Fahne!
Red Herring
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2017, 09:54:32 am »

Bad lifestyles save the state a fortune.

It's simple - the sooner we die after retirement, the less the government has to spend on us on the long run.

So Mr. X, who smokes, and dies of lung cancer at 70 is going to cost a lot less than Mrs. Y who lives to 100 before getting cancer. Mrs. Y costs another 30 years worth, of pension payments, care costs and NHS treatment.

The Daily Mail should be on its knees thanking us bad lifestylers  for our valiant sacrifice. We should have our own memorial day, instead of poppies everyone could wear a small pin depicting a pint of lager and a packet of smokes.

Red

 

 
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everso
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MR. PHILLIPS


« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2017, 11:19:54 am »

Bad lifestyles save the state a fortune.

It's simple - the sooner we die after retirement, the less the government has to spend on us on the long run.

So Mr. X, who smokes, and dies of lung cancer at 70 is going to cost a lot less than Mrs. Y who lives to 100 before getting cancer. Mrs. Y costs another 30 years worth, of pension payments, care costs and NHS treatment.

The Daily Mail should be on its knees thanking us bad lifestylers  for our valiant sacrifice. We should have our own memorial day, instead of poppies everyone could wear a small pin depicting a pint of lager and a packet of smokes.

Red

 

 

Exactly.  Alf Garnet once said it was his duty to smoke because of all the tax he paid on tobacco.
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vanceen
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« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2017, 04:19:55 pm »

Bad lifestyles save the state a fortune.

It's simple - the sooner we die after retirement, the less the government has to spend on us on the long run.

So Mr. X, who smokes, and dies of lung cancer at 70 is going to cost a lot less than Mrs. Y who lives to 100 before getting cancer. Mrs. Y costs another 30 years worth, of pension payments, care costs and NHS treatment.

The Daily Mail should be on its knees thanking us bad lifestylers  for our valiant sacrifice. We should have our own memorial day, instead of poppies everyone could wear a small pin depicting a pint of lager and a packet of smokes.

Red

 

 

I'm not sure you're right about that Red, although it has that contrarian ring of truth.

I can't be bothered to look up the exact figure, but I've read that for the average person, a surprisingly high percentage of health care costs are incurred in the last weeks life. Clean living Mrs. Y, who perhaps goes to her local surgery three times a year for sniffles and then dies unexpectedly of heart failure at 100, is by no means necessarily more expensive to the NHS than Mr. X, who has three lung lobectomies and then spends two months on an inhaler in intensive care before dying.
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Riotgrrl
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« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2017, 03:51:34 am »

Story in the Times today (it's behind a paywall, and i doubt any of you peasants have a sub) about new and potentially exciting cancer drugs.

Basically the story is saying that every time a new drug comes out, and there's a chance that it might give a particular cancer sufferer a few extra weeks or months alive, relatives and patients lobby, go public, criticise the politicians demanding that they be given a chance to try this new drug.   

The people who hold the NHS budgets are pointing out that for every experimental but potentially great cancer drug they are now paying for, other things don't get paid for.

There is some breast cancer drug that can extend life for a while, that costs £90k a year.  That's a lot of baby immunisations (or whatever has to get cut to pay for it.)

A rather robust commentator in the comments sections demands that the dying stop being so bloody selfish, and if they want to live a few more weeks or months they should pay for it out their own pocket instead of expecting the NHS to pick up the tab.

(Actually, my  mum died of a horrible cancer earlier this year.  Don't believe the shite that palliative care means nobody dies in pain.  I think we'd have paid out our own pockets for something which shortened the last few weeks of her life rather than extended it, but I guess not all cancers are the same.)
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everso
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MR. PHILLIPS


« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2017, 05:15:32 am »

Sorry to hear about your mum, Riot, and yes "palliative care" does not mean all pain is removed. 
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Red Herring
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« Reply #9 on: Yesterday at 08:11:51 am »

I'm not sure you're right about that Red, although it has that contrarian ring of truth.

I can't be bothered to look up the exact figure, but I've read that for the average person, a surprisingly high percentage of health care costs are incurred in the last weeks life. Clean living Mrs. Y, who perhaps goes to her local surgery three times a year for sniffles and then dies unexpectedly of heart failure at 100, is by no means necessarily more expensive to the NHS than Mr. X, who has three lung lobectomies and then spends two months on an inhaler in intensive care before dying.

It's not just NHS costs though. Even in the unlikely event that Mrs. Y makes it to 100 without needing a hip replacement, cataracts removed etc. etc she will still have drawn a state pension for 30 years longer than Mr. X without putting much back in.

Obviously clean living doesn't make you immune to dementia, hip replacements, cataracts etc. etc. Nor does it immunise you against cancer. Maybe Mrs. Y dies of a heart attack, but maybe she gets cancer (cancer risk increases dramatically with age), and she has to get the same treatment as Mr. X but much later in life. Equally, maybe Mr. X gets taken down by a massive heartache after downing his third bottle of whiskey and not only saves the NHS on treatment, but has contributed much more to the NHS through all the tax he has paid on Scotch.

Red
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ymrader
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« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 08:57:18 am »

It's not just NHS costs though. Even in the unlikely event that Mrs. Y makes it to 100 without needing a hip replacement, cataracts removed etc. etc she will still have drawn a state pension for 30 years longer than Mr. X without putting much back in.

Obviously clean living doesn't make you immune to dementia, hip replacements, cataracts etc. etc. Nor does it immunise you against cancer. Maybe Mrs. Y dies of a heart attack, but maybe she gets cancer (cancer risk increases dramatically with age), and she has to get the same treatment as Mr. X but much later in life. Equally, maybe Mr. X gets taken down by a massive heartache after downing his third bottle of whiskey and not only saves the NHS on treatment, but has contributed much more to the NHS through all the tax he has paid on Scotch.

Red

It's not the users crippling the NHS.
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Alte Dame, Alte Dame
Hertha BSC, so schön ist dein Name!
Die Farben Blau-Weiß,
die Trikots gestreift,
im Herzen weht nur eins:
Unsere Fahne!
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